(This is part 2 of an introduction to Asheville, North Carolina. In this episode, we cover the North, East, and West areas. Future updates will cover the communities that are South of the city.)

North Asheville –

Just north of downtown Asheville is the historic Grove Park neighborhood, which was first developed in the early 1920’s, and features many homes on wooded lots that are the classic, traditional homes of that era. The neighborhood is home to the Grove Park Inn and Spa, which includes an 18 hole Donald Ross designed golf course meandering through the northern part of this neighborhood. Nearby are the Albemarle Park and Norwood park areas, which typically have smaller lots and “arts and crafts” type houses. Many of the homes in these neighborhoods have some distinctive architectural details found throughout Asheville, such as Pebbledash stucco combined with cedar shake, and intricately patterned windows common to homes designed by architects of the period such as Richard Sharpe Smith. North Asheville also includes the Beaver Dam, Beaver Lake and Lakeview Park Neighborhoods. When searching for listings in this area use the 28801 and 28804 zip codes.

Bordering downtown Asheville’s north end is Montford, known for its beautiful Victorian era architecture and numerous arts and crafts type houses, many people first become acquainted with Montford by staying in one of its B&B’s. The neighborhood is within walking distance to downtown and UNCA-Asheville and is home to some of Asheville’s grandest old homes.

West Asheville –

West Asheville is technically part of Asheville, but you don’t get that feeling as you walk down Haywood Road, the mainline of this community. Historically, a middle class neighborhood, West Asheville’s buildings lack the close-knit proximity of downtown or the River District Studios. But the affordability of living and doing business here is drawing more artists to the area, and they share an attitude that promotes cooperation and symbiotic relationships. In many cities, the term “river district” conjures up images of upscale shops and trendy eateries. You won’t find many of those when you make the five minute drive from downtown to Asheville’s River District. A quick glance reveals a dozen industrial buildings adjacent to the French Broad River. In reality, they’re the workplaces, galleries, and sometimes the homes of some of Asheville’s most compelling artists. Many of whom display their works in downtown galleries, but they work here for the same reasons that once drew business downtown: ample space and cheaper rent. The panoply of artistic mediums-fibers, glass, metal,wood, paint, ceramics, and more-represented in the roughly four square blocks that make up the River District art studios is surpassed only by the quality of the craftsmanship and intriguing stories of the artists.

East Asheville –

East Asheville is close to downtown and is convenient to a bustling corridor of retail stores, diverse family-run restaurants and popular national eateries, extensive shopping and many different neighborhoods and communities. Beverly Hills, an older neighborhood in East Asheville, was built in and around Asheville Municipal Golf Course. It is near the two main thoroughfares if East Asheville, Tunnel Road and Swannanoa Road, which provides convenient access to both Asheville Mall and the many businesses in the area. This hilly, wooded neighborhood is very convenient yet also has a private, removed feel. Haw Creek, also in east Asheville, is a mature neighborhood with wooded lots having homes dating back to the 1920’s as well as many newer homes. The mature trees and winding roads make it feel more remote than it actually is. Another neighborhood in this area is Chunn’s Cove, is convenient to the Innsbruck Mall but offers a country feel as you can see cattle in several pastures. Chunn’s Cove goes off Tunnel road up into the hills, and is not really one neighborhood but merges scattered older homes, new subdivisions and scattered newer homes.